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Meet, Learn, Use

Our conference agenda will feature presentations on topics suggested by you, the GIS community of North Carolina. At NCGIS2023, you might hear about a new way to solve a problem, discover a new tool, or spend some time with a colleague you haven't seen in a while. In short, NCGIS2023 will offer everything you need to stay up to date on the latest technologies, techniques, and strategies that can help you be more successful in your GIS career.

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Meet, Learn, Use

Exhibits

A conference just isn't a conference without terrific exhibits. As in years past, NCGIS2023 will feature leading vendors of the industry who work in North Carolina. This year features a more convenient and prominent location for the exhibit hall so that everyone can take full advantage of the opportunity to speak with companies whose specialty is helping GIS'ers like us.

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Exhibits

Schedule

A sneak peek of the program. More details soon.

  • Day 1 7 Mar 23
  • Day 2 8 Mar 23
  • Day 3 9 Mar 23
  • Day 4 10 Mar 23
  • Salem 1A
  • Salem 1B/C
  • Salem 2
  • Salem 3A
  • Salem 3B
  • Salem 3C
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – Preparing for Change By Esri

This workshop supports attendees who are modernizing workflows using ArcGIS apps and capabilities, expanding ArcGIS access to new groups within their organization, or planning other GIS-related projects that will significantly impact how members of the workforce perform their jobs.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 12:00 PMCURISA Workshop – Real Time GIS for Safety By Esri

This workshop will cover how the ArcGIS system enables a flexible and extensive foundation for threat and hazard monitoring for facilities, infrastructure, and personnel appropriate for operations centers, real-time crime and fusion centers, corporate security, safety and security operations centers and more.

12:00 PM - 05:00 PMExhibit Hall and Room Setup
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
01:00 PM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – GIS Program Success Factors By CURISA

This workshop will examine the critical success factors that will help you ensure the success of your GIS program. Participants will leave with a comprehensive checklist of action items that will advance the success of their GIS program and career.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – Preparing for Change By Esri

This workshop supports attendees who are modernizing workflows using ArcGIS apps and capabilities, expanding ArcGIS access to new groups within their organization, or planning other GIS-related projects that will significantly impact how members of the workforce perform their jobs.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 12:00 PMCURISA Workshop – Real Time GIS for Safety By Esri

This workshop will cover how the ArcGIS system enables a flexible and extensive foundation for threat and hazard monitoring for facilities, infrastructure, and personnel appropriate for operations centers, real-time crime and fusion centers, corporate security, safety and security operations centers and more.

12:00 PM - 05:00 PMExhibit Hall and Room Setup
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
01:00 PM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – GIS Program Success Factors By CURISA

This workshop will examine the critical success factors that will help you ensure the success of your GIS program. Participants will leave with a comprehensive checklist of action items that will advance the success of their GIS program and career.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – Preparing for Change By Esri

This workshop supports attendees who are modernizing workflows using ArcGIS apps and capabilities, expanding ArcGIS access to new groups within their organization, or planning other GIS-related projects that will significantly impact how members of the workforce perform their jobs.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 12:00 PMCURISA Workshop – Real Time GIS for Safety By Esri

This workshop will cover how the ArcGIS system enables a flexible and extensive foundation for threat and hazard monitoring for facilities, infrastructure, and personnel appropriate for operations centers, real-time crime and fusion centers, corporate security, safety and security operations centers and more.

12:00 PM - 05:00 PMExhibit Hall and Room Setup
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
01:00 PM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – GIS Program Success Factors By CURISA

This workshop will examine the critical success factors that will help you ensure the success of your GIS program. Participants will leave with a comprehensive checklist of action items that will advance the success of their GIS program and career.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – Preparing for Change By Esri

This workshop supports attendees who are modernizing workflows using ArcGIS apps and capabilities, expanding ArcGIS access to new groups within their organization, or planning other GIS-related projects that will significantly impact how members of the workforce perform their jobs.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 12:00 PMCURISA Workshop – Real Time GIS for Safety By Esri

This workshop will cover how the ArcGIS system enables a flexible and extensive foundation for threat and hazard monitoring for facilities, infrastructure, and personnel appropriate for operations centers, real-time crime and fusion centers, corporate security, safety and security operations centers and more.

12:00 PM - 05:00 PMExhibit Hall and Room Setup
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
01:00 PM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – GIS Program Success Factors By CURISA

This workshop will examine the critical success factors that will help you ensure the success of your GIS program. Participants will leave with a comprehensive checklist of action items that will advance the success of their GIS program and career.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – Preparing for Change By Esri

This workshop supports attendees who are modernizing workflows using ArcGIS apps and capabilities, expanding ArcGIS access to new groups within their organization, or planning other GIS-related projects that will significantly impact how members of the workforce perform their jobs.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 12:00 PMCURISA Workshop – Real Time GIS for Safety By Esri

This workshop will cover how the ArcGIS system enables a flexible and extensive foundation for threat and hazard monitoring for facilities, infrastructure, and personnel appropriate for operations centers, real-time crime and fusion centers, corporate security, safety and security operations centers and more.

12:00 PM - 05:00 PMExhibit Hall and Room Setup
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
01:00 PM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – GIS Program Success Factors By CURISA

This workshop will examine the critical success factors that will help you ensure the success of your GIS program. Participants will leave with a comprehensive checklist of action items that will advance the success of their GIS program and career.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – Preparing for Change By Esri

This workshop supports attendees who are modernizing workflows using ArcGIS apps and capabilities, expanding ArcGIS access to new groups within their organization, or planning other GIS-related projects that will significantly impact how members of the workforce perform their jobs.

woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
08:30 AM - 12:00 PMCURISA Workshop – Real Time GIS for Safety By Esri

This workshop will cover how the ArcGIS system enables a flexible and extensive foundation for threat and hazard monitoring for facilities, infrastructure, and personnel appropriate for operations centers, real-time crime and fusion centers, corporate security, safety and security operations centers and more.

12:00 PM - 05:00 PMExhibit Hall and Room Setup
woman sharing her presentation with her colleagues
01:00 PM - 04:30 PMCURISA Workshop – GIS Program Success Factors By CURISA

This workshop will examine the critical success factors that will help you ensure the success of your GIS program. Participants will leave with a comprehensive checklist of action items that will advance the success of their GIS program and career.

  • Salem 1A
  • Salem 1B/C
  • Salem 2
  • Salem 3A
  • Salem 3B
  • Salem 3C
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Morning Coffee

Enjoy a nice cup of coffee to get the morning started and prepare for a wonderful day of conference activities.

08:00 AMExhibits Open
08:00 AM - 08:30 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMOpening Plenary (Welcome, Keynote, & Conference Details)

Salem 2 Ballroom

11:30 AM - 01:30 AMLunch (provided)
01:30 PM - 02:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
Vendor Presentation
02:00 PM - 02:30 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
02:30 PM - 03:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
04:00 PM - 04:30 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
04:30 PM - 05:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSocial & Poster Session
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Morning Coffee

Enjoy a nice cup of coffee to get the morning started and prepare for a wonderful day of conference activities.

08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMThe importance of a good elevator pitch to describe what you do By Tripp Corbin

As GIS folks, we are often asked what we do or how we can help. For some reason these questions catch us by surprise. So we blurt out things like, we are google maps on steroids’ or we make maps or we analyze spatial data. While these are not untrue, they really don’t provide a good understanding of the true power we bring to the table. Having a well thought out elevator pitch to explain what you do is important for letting those you serve understand your value and that of GIS.

This presentation will explain what an elevator pitch is and what a good one should include.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMOpening Plenary (Welcome, Keynote, & Conference Details)

Salem 2 Ballroom

11:30 AM - 01:30 AMLunch (provided)
01:30 PM - 02:00 PMNC DOA Expanded Use of ArcGIS Online & Indoors for Real Property Analysis + Reporting By John Cox & Charlie Charping

This presentation will focus on NC DOA SPO’s use of ArcGIS Online and Indoors technologies to analysis and reporting on the performance of the state’s real property information. The process for collecting and utilizing building space data for space allocation and planning analysis will be presented. These new tools and methods are streamlining the states evaluation of its real property resources and providing helpful new applications for quickly visualizing and evaluating business intelligence. Several ArcGIS-configurable applications designed to provide quick, easy-to-understand real property performance evaluation and decision support for mandated real property performance measures will be demonstrated.

02:00 PM - 02:30 PMGot Indoor Maps? By Ethan Credle

The location accuracy of wireless 911 calls continue to improve with the deployment of new device location technologies. As a result of more accurate caller locations indoors, maps detailing indoor spaces are now in demand for 9-1-1 call takers and emergency responders. Some cutting edge technology endeavors are now underway to allow our ECC’s to take advantage of both publicly available and locally authoritative purpose built indoor GIS data sets. The presentation will discuss the technologies behind indoor maps and how it is being used for situational awareness and responder safety.

02:30 PM - 03:00 PMWhat’s new at NC Emergency Management By Daniel Madding

NC Emergency Management has several projects going on including updating our building footprint dataset. We are working with local governments to collect elevation certificates. The goal is to get First Floor Elevations and other attributes.

Other projects and topics include:
A new tool to extract attributes from the statewide parcel dataset.
A new routine for converting forecasted rainfall into (flood) occurrence intervals.
RAFT the new web based tool for displaying what roads will flood at different occurrence intervals (50 year, 100 year).

03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMNC Broadband By Broadband Staff & Ben Shelton
04:00 PM - 04:30 PMHow to Prepare for a Fire Insurance Rating By Adam Blythe

This presentation is for local and private GIS organizations who provide mapping services for ISO/OSFM fire insurance ratings, or individuals interested in how your local fire department is rated. The North Carolina Department of Insurance -Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) provides fire department ratings for all jurisdiction in North Carolina with a population less than 100,000 and is responsible for the collection and quality control for the GIS data provided for the inspections. The accuracy of the data submitted can have a sizeable effect on the overall outcome of the rating, so this presentation will cover the basics of a rating inspection, what are the GIS requirements, how to prepare for an inspection, and answer any questions that arise.

04:30 PM - 05:00 PMNext Gen 911 By Matt McLamb
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSocial & Poster Session
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Morning Coffee

Enjoy a nice cup of coffee to get the morning started and prepare for a wonderful day of conference activities.

08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMOpening Plenary (Welcome, Keynote, & Conference Details)

Salem 2 Ballroom

11:30 AM - 01:30 AMLunch (provided)
01:30 PM - 02:30 PMUtilities Panel Discussion
02:30 PM - 03:00 PMHow to Implement a Stormwater GIS Program from Scratch By Meredith Stull

Starting a GIS program from scratch can be very intimidating. Where and how do you start? At the local government level, geospatial technology is used to make informed, data-driven policy decisions. This presentation will outline the key elements and best practices of a successful Stormwater GIS Program. Key elements of a successful Stormwater GIS Program include strategic planning, data management techniques, selecting optimal field data collection technology, asset management, collaboration with internal and external colleagues, and GIS outreach. The development of data standards will be discussed to emphasize the importance of departmental collaboration. Diversity and inclusion efforts are considered every step along the way to cultivate accountability within the organization. Commentary on lessons learned will highlight the use of GIS to address challenges faced by local governments. The Durham County Stormwater GIS Program was implemented in 2021, and we are continuously working to streamline our workflows to best support our citizens and stakeholders.

03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMUtility Web Mapping Applications for Campus Operations By Andrew Futrell & Laurel Krynock

Managing and understanding underground infrastructure has many challenges on a university campus with more than 10 utility systems. Some of the challenges include identifying utility ownership, depth, size, age and material, understanding the impacts of utility isolation, managing utility access, and numerous other needs. The NC State Enterprise GIS team has developed enterprise GIS data for most key utility systems on campus. This GIS data supports a wide range of end users and needs including the University Locator, University Surveyor, planners, construction managers, field technicians, engineers, landscape architects, and people working in real estate, environmental health & safety, grounds, and other areas. This data is the basis for key web mapping applications which allow users to view utility locations, critical attributes and highlight characteristics of the utility systems such as age, ownership, or material type. This presentation will highlight two applications, the NC State Utilities Viewer and the Utility Assessment Dashboard, and include a discussion of the ArcGIS Enterprise architecture and workflows that allow for sharing accurate and up-to-date utility information with end users.

Our Web Application Utilities Viewer has been our biggest GIS success story at NC State. This application shows a highly accurate and functional roadmap of all our underground infrastructure. The aforementioned attribute data as well as project information and work order assets have been identified and hyperlinked. Linking construction project documentation to utility assets was a low-hanging fruit opportunity that has benefitted all users with access to Utilities Viewer. The former process for finding As-Builts, project documentation and photographs was very labor intensive. It typically involved picking the brains of project managers, contractors or field crews for institutional knowledge. Like many organizations, when an employee retires or moves on, that invaluable information leaves with them. Utilities Viewer has had a positive impact for both veteran employees as well as new hires with no knowledge of our active systems.

Another successful Web Application is our Utility Assessment Dashboard. This dashboard serves the same enterprise GIS data as Utilities Viewer, but this application highlights our old, active legacy infrastructure. Facility planners are able to visually identify which pipes to replace in lieu of traditional spreadsheet lists. We are currently upgrading our legacy underground Electrical Distribution System. During this process we’re using the dashboard to identify adjacent water lines to replace while roadways are closed during construction.

By having a solid understanding of our underground systems, our safety culture has improved tremendously. Engineers and field crews are quickly able to identify where to isolate pressurized/energized utilities to safely perform maintenance. Knowing these key isolation points, we can communicate with campus users (our customers) which buildings/departments will be impacted. Our next goals are to explore the use of ArcGIS Field Maps for data collection efforts and additional applications to further share the capabilities of GIS to both existing and new users.

04:00 PM - 05:00 PMAnnexations Panel Discussion By Rich Elkins & Others
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSocial & Poster Session
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Morning Coffee

Enjoy a nice cup of coffee to get the morning started and prepare for a wonderful day of conference activities.

08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMOpening Plenary (Welcome, Keynote, & Conference Details)

Salem 2 Ballroom

11:30 AM - 01:30 AMLunch (provided)
01:30 PM - 02:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
02:00 PM - 02:30 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
02:30 PM - 03:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 AM - 04:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
04:00 PM - 04:30 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
04:30 AM - 05:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSocial & Poster Session
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Morning Coffee

Enjoy a nice cup of coffee to get the morning started and prepare for a wonderful day of conference activities.

08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMEmergency Event Management System By Durmus Cesur

Emergency Event Management System (EMS) provides automated, coordinated, rapid and information-driven response capabilities for emergency events in the DC Water jurisdiction. EMS builts upon Enterprise GIS and Enterprise Asset Management Systems and pulls data from variety of other integrated systems as well. EMS provides a real-time integrated platform to monitor emergencies impacting the water/sewer/stormwater distribution and collection systems/services and acts as an early warning system for non-routine or critical events allowing DC Water to provide a faster response and reduce the overall impact of events

In EMS, various dashboards with variety of real-time and other data feeds are implemented. One of these dashboards is Incident Tracking Tool is an interactive (for Command Center users only) to manage reported incidents and related work orders to address city-wide emergency events and incidents related to DC Water’s services. The WaterTrack and FloodTrack are view-only dashboards for providing real-time information regarding the incidents, workorders, vehicles, PCS, SCADA, and other sensors data in DC Water’s jurisdiction including the ones obtained from third parties such as Washington Aqueduct.

Water Crew and Sewer Crew dashboards track crew vehicles, their assignments and locations. Alert dashboards give information about water and flood related critical incidents and send update emails to DC Water users based on certain thresholds. Additionally, EMS provides capabilities to sent updates to customers using Message Management System (MMS) which integrates with Email/SMS regarding emergency workorders impacting users water/sewer services.

The dashboards have been integrated to online weather services for rain and event data. They are designed to give alerts in case of non-routine critical events in sewer collection and water distribution systems.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMOpening Plenary (Welcome, Keynote, & Conference Details)

Salem 2 Ballroom

11:30 AM - 01:30 AMLunch (provided)
01:30 PM - 02:00 PMForsyth CARES (Community Assistance Registry for Emergency Services) By Jason Clodfelter & Det. Dave Mundy

Forsyth CARES is a collaborative effort by MapForsyth, Town of Kernersville Police Department, Forsyth County Emergency Services, Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office and City of Winston-Salem Police Department. The goal of this initiative is to provide emergency responders with specific situational awareness regarding individuals with medical and/or mental health needs prior to arrival on scene. The data also provides important neighbor and contact information to assist in searching for missing persons or performing death investigations.

The registry of voluntarily provided, personal information is collected via crowd-source using ESRI Survey123 and provided to emergency communications centers and first responders through various means. To date, the registry includes participants with dementia, Alzheimer’s and autism, to name a few. The information provided by participants, or a loved one, can prove critical in emergency situations. Examples of this data include physical characteristics, recent photo, medical devices used, current medications, primary method of communication/language spoken, vehicles available, along with many others.

The presentation will outline the entire process of the project; from need and concept (by Kernersville Police) to full county-wide implementation across multiple jurisdictions, agencies and PSAPs. This will include discussions on the development of end-user products built on the ESRI platform of products, the use of Python and Arcade and computer-aided dispatch (CAD) integration.

02:00 PM - 02:30 PMApplying Local NOAA sea level rise temporal model estimates to local resolution elevation data By Doug Newcomb

Sea level rise related to climate change will impact the habitats of coastal species of concern to the USFWS. National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and other conservation dedicated lands will be impacted as well. The graphical products provided by NOAA though the seal level rise viewer https://coast.noaa.gov/slr/ and associated downloadable datasets only provide inundation data at 1-foot or 1-meter intervals with references to timing of the inundation only provided at specific local gage locations. Planning responses to climate-induced sea level rise requires the creation of data sets that estimate sea level rise at a landscape scale for each scenario over time that shows the impact with high resolution elevation data sets.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides local Relative Sea Level Rise (RSLR) data at 10-year intervals at Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) for each of the Global Climate Change Sea Level Rise Scenarios as a grid of points spaced at 1-degree intervals with additional points for the locations of permanent tidal gages along the coast. This data set covers all coastal areas for States, Territories and Possessions of the United States. These data points for the coast of North Carolina and adjoining coastal areas of Virginia and South Carolina were used to create 100m resolution Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolated surfaces for each of the 10-year time steps for each of the 2017 SLR model scenarios and intersected with the NOAA 3m DEM and a modified 5ft DEM for the coast of of NC and estuarine -connected SE VA.

The resulting direct and indirect potential inundation data layers were intersected with the PAD-US conservation lands data set, https://www.usgs.gov/programs/gap-analysis-project/science/pad-us-data-overview non-DOD conservation lands data set, with refuge boundaries for the area, and with known habitat for a plant species of concern in the study area to determine projected impacts over time under each of the sea level rise scenarios at 10-year intervals.

The presentation will include efforts at validation using 2020 imagery from the Planet constellation and plans to update to the 2022 RSLR projections.

02:30 PM - 03:00 PMSaltwater Intrusion in Carteret County, North Carolina: Identification and Mitigation By Sarah Radel

The correlation between saltwater intrusion and the conversion of Coastal forests to Ghost Forests is of the upmost concern in Carteret County, North Carolina. A ghost forest is the dead and dying remains of a once thriving coastal forest that has been invaded by encroaching saltwater. These forests are vast with coastal wetlands, swamps, seagrass, and vegetated shorelines, providing Carteret County with a critical ecosystem that is rich in biodiversity. This crucial ecosystem sequesters and stores copious amounts of carbon, mitigating the effects of climate change, regulating water flow, and protecting inland coastal communities from extreme weather events and sea level rise. Unfortunately, due to the compounding effects of anthropogenic activities this coastal system is shrinking. Spatial analysis utilizing Esri software was used to encapsulate data representing the extent of saltwater intrusion and its explanatory factors. National Landcover Data was obtained from the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium from the most recent year of 2019. Sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios procured from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Office for Coastal Management, depicting 2ft, 4ft, 6ft, 8ft, and 10ft sea-level rise were utilized to aid in the identification of coastal forest transition to Ghost Forest setting a 50-meter buffer from the shoreline. Spatial analytics was run to show the percentage of pixel conversion from land to saltwater for the years 2020 through 2100 under failure to curb future emissions scenario. Results show there are substantial shifts in land cover implicated by sea level rise. For instance, deciduous forests decreased 51% at 4ft sea-level rise during the time period 2020-2040. Projections indicate pixel conversion percentages will decrease over time signifying the transition and disappearance of our coastal forest. Building living seawalls in areas that are under direct threat of transitioning to Ghost forests can mitigate the negative effects of sea-level rise.  These natural, living shorelines provide stabilization and serve to accommodate natural protection, reduce erosion, and act as barriers that allow forests to adapt in place without up-slope migration.   

03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMLocal groundwater surfaces: Opportunities, edge effects, and scale By Jesse Rouse & Madan Maharjan

With climate change impacting water access around the globe, local groundwater monitoring projects can provide a large-scale lens on potential opportunities and issues related to data acquisition, processing, visualization, and interpretation. Since the fall of 2017 the Robeson County Groundwater Monitoring Project (RCGMP) has utilized a group of existing and newly drilled wells across the county that connect to the Black Creek aquifer to record continuous groundwater levels. The data collection process has not always been smooth and those working on the project have had the opportunity to learn from missteps as the project continues. This paper will discuss some of these issues faced to date as a ‘better practices’ suggestion to similar projects. More importantly, however, this paper will discuss some of the issues specific to our groundwater modeling and the creation of potentiometric surfaces relating to edge effects in data processing, and the impact of larger scale data collection on understanding the local groundwater surface compared to existing groundwater surface maps for Robeson County.

04:00 PM - 04:30 PMFieldMaps for Environmental Health By Kathryn Clifton & Anthony Williams

Faced with a backlog of requests, aging equipment, and a limited number of field staff, Davidson County Environmental Health turned to the GIS Division for assistance in upgrading their field data collection processes and workflows. GIS staff began with a database design from a neighboring county, and with input from Environmental Health staff honed the design to suit the needs of Davidson County. This presentation will provide an overview of the database design process and its use in several ArcGIS Online solutions. Applications include ArcMap, ArcGIS Pro, Field Maps, Web AppBuilder, and Dashboards.

04:30 PM - 05:00 PMApplying Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning to Real-World Problems By Jim Alberque

Sensors and Instrumentation are being deployed in our communities to help better understand assets status and usage. This IOT revolution represents several opportunities to better understand our city and provide staff and citizens with information and knowledge. This presentation will be a walk through of some simple and complex examples for the City of Raleigh.

05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSocial & Poster Session
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Morning Coffee

Enjoy a nice cup of coffee to get the morning started and prepare for a wonderful day of conference activities.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMOpening Plenary (Welcome, Keynote, & Conference Details)

Salem 2 Ballroom

11:30 AM - 01:30 AMLunch (provided)
01:30 PM - 02:00 PMGISP By Tony Spicci
02:00 PM - 02:30 PMThe Interactive Mapping of the NCDOT Research Project Program Using Story Maps By Timothy Mulrooney & Mike Wallace

Since its inception, the NCDOT Research Project program, has supported more than 500 research projects. While information about each is accessible through the NCDOT Research Project database portal (https://connect.ncdot.gov/projects/research/Pages/ProjectSearch.aspx), these projects have not been mapped to display the spatial distribution of the recipients of the awards, along with a summary of the awards by organization. Interactive maps through a portal such as ArcGIS Online (http://www.arcgis.com) and Esri StoryMaps (https://storymaps.arcgis.com/) which utilize AGOL’s cloud-based maps provide a means by which NCDOT research projects can be mapped as point features and these real-world point locations can serve as links to additional information about the projects to include the PI(s), committee chairpersons and managers, year of project, project number, images and link to final reports. These user-friendly and interactive mapping tools developed by the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences (DEEGS) at North Carolina Central University complement the existing NCDOT Research Project database by providing another means to market, query and search this valuable information. These tools furthermore provide maps, documents and images related to field sites related linked to NCDOT projects that can be stored and accessed using cloud services.

02:30 PM - 03:00 PMHigh Resolution Land Cover for the Nation By Brandon Palin

Derived from 15-30cm stereo-aerial imagery, Ecopia has produced the first-of-its-kind, high-resolution Nationwide 3D Land Cover Map which will be maintained on a consistent basis. Covering over 3.2 million square miles across the country including 172 million 3D buildings, Ecopia’s 3D Nationwide Landcover offers a highly-accurate digital representation of the built and natural environment across the country. The diverse range of applications benefiting from this unique dataset includes:

• Flood mapping & stormwater utility planning
• Transportation engineering and pedestrian safety
• Public safety and emergency response management
• Conservation, environmental planning, and climate change mitigation
• Property insurance underwriting, risk management, and claims

For decades, NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM) has produced consistent, accurate land cover, but has seen increased demand for more detailed, local level data. In response, OCM has established a partnership to leverage Ecopia’s high-resolution vector maps in order to deliver Impervious, Vegetation Canopy, and Water classifications for the coastal areas of the Contiguous U.S and entire state of Alaska (over 1.3 million sq. miles of area). These products support NOAA’s efforts at producing 1-meter publicly accessible land cover products for the Nation.

This presentation will focus on the geospatial products produced by Ecopia and those released publicly by NOAA. Specifically, how these products may work together to fit a wide range of needs, and how Federal, State, and Municipal level governments can take advantage of these efforts to obtain high-quality, up-to-date land cover information.

03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 AM - 04:00 PMBuilding Asset Inventories: Remote Sensing and Automation By Jonathan Austin

This presentation will cover how remote sensing technology – including UAS, street-level mobile imagery, and lidar – are used to inventory roadway assets. We will review how the latest sensors and machine learning software are being deployed today for pavement modeling, sign inventories, and stormwater management including real-world examples. We will also talk about how machine learning algorithms can be leveraged by GIS users to make the most of their data and build their asset database.

04:00 PM - 04:30 PMLessons Learned in UAS Based Remote Sensing for Mobile Data Collection By Matthew Nanney

This presentation provides an overview of lessons learned from UAS survey and mobile data collection projects. Discrete example of project hiccups and corrections will be discussed focusing on the technical side of the experience. Frequently mobile data collection, inspections, and UAS inspection can be implemented as complimentary technologies. However it requires adapting each parties workflow to provide that level of collaborative engagement. Implementing a “collect quality data first” mindset is found to be a better tactic than a “fix it during processing” despite potential delays in the field or longer field days.

04:30 PM - 05:00 PMFuture of Managed Services By Kent Rothrock & Wendy Peloquin

GIS has abandoned a proprietary world for a more open enterprise environment, where many operational systems must successfully integrate. Maintaining staff with the skills to manage a modern GIS enterprise can be hard for many orgs and outside help is often sought for high-level support. Some vendors now offer Managed Services, which can take many forms, but is meant to support the enterprise GIS in some manner. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the GIS Managed Services industry.

  • Salem 1A
  • Salem 1B/C
  • Salem 2
  • Salem 3A
  • Salem 3B
  • Salem 3C
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
08:30 AM - 09:00 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 10:30 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
11:00 AM - 11:30 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
11:30 AM - 01:30 PMLunch (Awards & Keynote Address)

The Gallery Ballroom

01:30 PM - 02:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
02:00 PM - 02:30 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
02:30 PM - 03:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
04:00 PM - 04:30 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
04:30 PM - 05:00 PMVendor Presentation By TBD
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSpecial Interest Groups
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
08:30 AM - 09:00 AMA Geospatial Coastal Resilience Assessment for the United States By Greg Dobson

As sea levels rise and coastal storm events occur with increased intensity and frequency, many coastal communities—both human and natural—have become more vulnerable to the resulting impacts. A recent project led by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, NOAA, and UNC Asheville’s National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center has produced GIS-based Regional Coastal Resilience Assessments for all U.S. coastlines. The assessments identify areas of open space where implementing nature-based solutions, such as wetland restoration, has the greatest potential to benefit fish and wildlife while also building resilience for communities exposed to flooding threats.

Through the integration of geospatial analyses using raster modeling and spatial analytical techniques, two key composite index layers were created to (1) inform areas of high flooding threat, and (2) to highlight areas of dense critical community assets and population. These two composite index layers were combined to generate a final community exposure index that showed where community assets are exposed to coastal flood threats. Two additional composite index layers were also generated to show the presence of terrestrial and aquatic fish and wildlife species, combining to create a final fish and wildlife index.

Finally, resilience hubs were developed to provide a lens with which the community exposure and fish and wildlife indices values could be analyzed and ranked to better understand where proposed mitigation and restoration projects could be most favorably located. These hubs identify natural open spaces or habitats suitable for conservation or restoration efforts capable of generating dual benefits for protecting fish and wildlife habitat while also building resilience of coastal communities.

The assessments are delivered through a custom interactive mapping tool called the Coastal Resilience Evaluation and Siting Tool, in which users can view and interact with the assessment results, analyze possible project sites, and download input and final data.

09:00 AM - 09:30 AMGIS and Resiliency: Using GIS to make our City and Citizens resilient By Alice Wilson

The City of New Bern has been impacted by multiple storm events as well as severe flooding depending on how the wind blows. Rather than simply replace homes, businesses and infrastructure, the City is working with multiple agencies to better understand the impacts of these events and ways the City can design better, changes storm water systems and other design standards to make the citizens and the City as a whole more resilient and better at withstanding such events. In mid 2022, the City adopted a new resiliency plan that uses on 6 pillars: Health & Safety; Housing; Economy; Infrastructure, Natural Resources and its Cultural Heritage.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 10:30 AMMaster Addressing Repository, What’s Now? By Matthew Hamby

This presentation will focus on what do to once you have a master address repository (MAR) in place. Over the past few years MapForsyth has worked on the consolation and cleaning of the county’s address data. Now that MapForsyth has a working MAR, we are working through the integration process. MapForsyth has partnered with Twin City Data to complete MAR integrations with other databases and systems throughout the County. This presentation will highlight the process, reporting and ROI of integrating the MAR with other systems. We will share the lessons learned from this process.

10:30 AM - 11:00 AMAddressNC Program Workflows By Darrin Smith

Addresses have been identified as a priority statewide framework dataset and an essential component to State agency programs such as N.C. Broadband, and as a fundamental requirement for validation and accurate call routing within NG911. The purpose of this abstract is to understand important need to know and to define the core process workflows that complete a full-circle approach of address maintenance and sustainability through applied enhancements and quality control beyond 911 requirements.

The presentation identifies the application of consistent standards to addresses and the methods to capture values and apply quality control for enhanced attributes. It defines analytical approaches for assessing completeness, location precision, and to identify potential for locations to update for subsequent updates. It provides the means for access to quality control assessments that provide an easy and intuitive incentive for the authoritative providers to find and address quality control issues. It demonstrates how to load supplemental geocoding services hosted through NC OneMap. Finally, it directs the end-user how to find the data and QC results.

11:00 AM - 11:30 AMGeodetic Survey By Gary Thompson
11:30 AM - 01:30 PMLunch (Awards & Keynote Address)

The Gallery Ballroom

01:30 PM - 02:00 PMNorth Carolina DOT: Automated Analysis Tools for Comprehensive Transportation Planning By Eric Wilson & David Chrest

NCDOT’s Transportation Planning Division (TPD) taps into the technology and spatial analysis capabilities available with GIS data and software to generate long-term, long-range transportation plans for municipalities, counties, and large metropolitan areas. Engineers at the Transportation Planning Division utilize a comprehensive, data-rich, multifunctional GIS Database and a suite of custom tools for their analysis. Comprehensive Transportation Plans (CTP) are developed with data-driven recommendations backed by geospatial-based analysis across multiple transportation modes. The GIS Unit at the North Carolina Department of Information Technology-Transportation serves the TPD in providing a full-service package of data, tools, maps, documentation, technical support, analysis assistance, and project development.

Three main components make up the GIS array used in the CTP process: data, tools, and maps. A quarterly-updated statewide geodatabase containing over 150 supporting data layers, a custom-designed road network for multi-modal transportation representation, and additional transportation-related data, is provided as a starting point to create a specific CTP Study Area Geodatabase. Specifically designed data schemas aid TPD in transportation analysis and recommendation entry for a CTP. An ArcGIS Pro Ribbon loaded with powerful, custom-designed tools automate data processing, calculations, and validation, illustrated report production, and formatted transportation recommendation information documents. All generated based on information existing in a CTP Study Area Geodatabase. A large set of custom-designed maps with preloaded data definitions and queries are at the ready to import any CTP Study Area Geodatabase. The number of maps for a CTP, ranging anywhere from 30 to 100, help visualize and identify recommended transportation improvement needs, developing long term solutions for the next 30 years.

An overview of the GIS Database design and analysis methodologies used by NCDOT’s Transportation Planning Division will be presented, with a focus on specifics regarding how the data is designed to enable geospatial analysis for transportation improvement planning. Live demos of several of the custom tools designed to produce formatted, illustrated reports directly from the geodatabase will also be shown.

02:00 PM - 02:30 PMTown of Cary’s Street Improvements Project utilizing Field Maps and GIS By Michelle Lopez

Every year the Town of Cary completes a Pavement Condition Survey (PCS) that involves approximately 500 miles of town-maintained roadways within the town’s limits to determine Pavement Condition Ratings (PCRs). The PCR allows identification of roads that need to be further investigated for next paving season. Phase II of this process is a Pavement Repair Survey (PRS) of approximately 21 miles that involves walking the individual segments to determine necessary pavement repairs. This information is developed into design plans and quantities/cost estimate so the contractor can make the necessary improvements to maintain quality of roads the citizens of Cary expect. Phase III includes construction management.

Our project team has been involved with this annual project for over 7 years and each year makes improvements to the process. For example, the Worst First method for identification of streets for the PRS phase evolved into the paving groups with permanent numbers. This change reduced construction fatigue, mobilization, outreach, and construction costs.

For the FY 23 Street Improvement Project we assessed how we could improve the process of the data collection for the continuous improvements. Previously, field data was collected solely on hard copy maps and then had to be manually transcribed into GIS and CAD formats for development into plans. This process was very time and labor intensive. We transitioned into all mobile data collection utilizing Field Maps paired with a GNSS receiver. The field collection time for the data took approximately the same amount of time as the paper maps from the previous years, but the pre and post processing time significantly decreased.

02:30 PM - 03:00 PMModernization of Crossing Inventory, NCDOT Rail Division’s Transition from Paper Forms to Field Maps By David Mathern & Chris Raichle

The NCDOT Rail Division is required to visit and inventory every public road railroad crossing once every three years. Railroad crossing data has been managed in a proprietary database that lacks geospatial capabilities, and data collection has been facilitated using paper forms. The Rail Division is working towards transitioning to ESRI’s Field Maps digital form solution to increase productivity and streamline the ingestion of onsite assessments by field technicians. It will also assist managers by applying data metrics to track progress and manage resource needs.

03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMSocial & Environmental Vulnerability Data Review By Tammie Tucker

The current Executive Administration has issued several executive orders that place a focus on social equity and environmental justice for Federal programs and agencies. While Federal agencies are working to incorporate these orders, many other programs – regional, state, local, and non-governmental – are also considering these principles. This presentation will introduce the audience to numerous publicly available social and environmental vulnerability datasets that can be used to inform any type of project on its social implications.

04:00 PM - 04:30 PMTBD By Renee Kramer
04:30 PM - 05:00 PMUsing Data to Make Informed Decisions in Forsyth County By Russell Smith & Zach Blizard

In the Summer of 2021 and in response to a call for proposals from Forsyth County, the Spatial Justice Studio @ the Center for Design Innovation was contracted to develop a Neighborhood Opportunity Atlas (NOA). The focus of the proposal was to provide a more holistic analysis of conditions across the county that can be used to identify, compare and assess neighborhoods in Forsyth County now and into the future for planning, programming, budgeting and evaluation. The atlas was presented as an innovative, statistical, and geographic product that could provide quantitative census tract level information for a wide range of community indicators and begin a process to identify, target and tackle underperforming neighborhoods.

The goals of the NOA included:
• developing a holistic analysis of neighborhood conditions across a wide range of variables;
• expanding upon the Distressed Communities Report – 2016;
• creating a ‘benchmark’ document for evaluating projects, programs and budgets; and
• growing conversations focused on making decisions that promote access, equity, inclusivity, justice and sustainability within Forsyth County.

The NOA uses a combination of the knowledge of urban studies and the power of data science to begin to explore opportunities and challenges at the census tract level. By combining these two areas, Forsyth County can get an accurate baseline for existing conditions within communities throughout the County and target programs, policies and budgets to help all neighborhoods achieve a level of spatial justice. In the end, the NOA will provide information, but that alone will not make a difference, political will and community engagement will also need to be parts of the solution to making all of Forsyth County sustainable.

This presentation will provide an overview of the process, highlight the resulting interactive website that was created, and discuss the challenges and opportunities moving ahead.

05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSpecial Interest Groups
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 11:30 AMLGC
11:30 AM - 01:30 PMLunch (Awards & Keynote Address)

The Gallery Ballroom

01:30 PM - 03:00 PMSGUC
03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 05:00 PMNC DEQ
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSpecial Interest Groups
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
08:30 AM - 09:00 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 10:30 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
11:00 AM - 11:30 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
11:30 AM - 01:30 PMLunch (Awards & Keynote Address)

The Gallery Ballroom

01:30 PM - 02:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
02:00 PM - 02:30 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
02:30 PM - 03:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
04:00 PM - 04:30 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
04:30 PM - 05:00 PMHerb Stout Student By TBD
05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSpecial Interest Groups
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
08:30 AM - 09:00 AMMapping Beck Knob Cemetery By Randal Hale

For the past 120 years, Beck Knob cemetery has been a repository of centuries worth of history and culture. It was provided by Joshua Beck as a resting place for slaves and their families. Through the years Beck Knob has been documented through photographs and small mapping expeditions. In 2022, North River Geographic Systems, Inc and Platinum Geomatics set out to map the people buried in Beck Knob. This has turned into a large data collection project using Mergin Maps (Mobile Client for QGIS). It’s also turned into a providing ground for Pleasant Gardens Cemetery and possibly the start of a project anyone with QGIS can use.

09:00 AM - 09:30 AMUtilizing Story Maps and GIS Technology to Map the Historic Great Wagon Road Routes By William Moore

This presentation will focus on how MapForsyth has worked together with local historian and the former director of Historic Bethabara Park (Rod Meyer) to develop a set of ESRI Story Maps which highlight the routes of the 18th century King’s Roads (“Great Wagon Road”), along with points of interest from the North Carolina border to Salisbury, NC. By combining GIS technology such as Historic Aerial Photography from NC OneMap with Digital Elevation Models, Hillshades, and current Orthophotography, Mapforsyth was able to map the routes that Rod had walked in the early 1990’s as part of his personal research project, and organize the maps, photos, and field notes from his research into a set of Story Maps organized within a Hub Site that preserves this information amid the rapidly changing landscape.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 10:30 AMCensus By Bob Coats
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMNC Demographic Analysis and Visualization Toolset By Okan Pala & Adem Kurtipek

The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NC DOT) is the agency responsible for designing, building, and maintaining transportation infrastructure in North Carolina. As governments at all levels are attempting to distribute benefits and costs more evenly amongst various demographic groups, it is important that NC DOT understands the groups of people they are impacting when proposing and building projects. We developed two online platforms specifically tailored to provide demographic analysis and visualization options that NCDOT practitioners can use for either quick analysis of an area in question or more detailed analysis for regulatory/permitting purposes. First platform is the custom developed JavaScript based “Demographic Analysis Web App”. The second platform is the “EJ Dashboard”.

The NCDOT use 5 year rolling averages of American Community Survey (ACS) data to evaluate demographics in project areas. Therefore, the goal of the “Demographic Analysis Web App” was to develop an application that enables the NCDOT to view the previous 10 years ACS data at various geographic scales, visualize and analyze how it changed over time and how data in various areas compares to other areas. This application enables the client to visualize any ACS variable at all available scales. It also makes it very easy to compare to other selected areas and to higher geometries. The application is written in JavaScript so the platform is flexible and easy to expand as NCDOT’s needs evolve. The use of Dynamic Map Image Layers and JavaScript enabled the use of on-the-fly joins and rendering, which the which allowed for an extremely flexible application, that meets all the project requirements. In order to load the data, we first developed a Python script to parse raw census data and map the data to appropriate fields in non-spatial tables in a geodatabase. When data in new tables or fields is detected, the code creates a new table for field in the geodatabase. We then added the Census block groups, tracts, zip codes, counties and state feature classes to the geodatabase. Next, we loaded geodatabase into a PostgreSQL enterprise geodatabase and published to ArcGIS Enterprise on the server as a map service. Developing the application using JavaScript allowed us to achieve On-the-Fly joins of multiple tables. The application also renders the web map with “Dynamic Map Image Layers” in order to enable the user to visualize the ACS data for any selected geometry, table and field in the entire database. The user can select any geometry, any table and any field in the database and create a visualization.

The “EJ Dashboard” is a fast-drawing web-based dashboard designed for quick visualization of areas for select demographic categories of interest. EJ score was calculated two different ways to be visualized. First method is using “Standard Deviation” that is calculated by giving values from 1 to 4 to Low Income and Minority layers. Block groups below the county average are assigned 1 and 2 (for full and half standard deviations below average), while those a half and one standard deviation above the county average are assigned values of 3 and 4. We add the values for a total score out of 8. The second EJ calculation method was “Quantile” that is calculated by assigning values from 1 to 10 to Low Income and Minority layers. These values are assigned for every 10%, so block groups below 10% equal 1, and those above 90% equal 10. Values are added for a total score out of 20. We also included demographic groups like “Hispanic”, “Low Income”, “Minority” and “Over 65” as well as “Language Needs” categories such as “Language Assistance” and “Limited English”, “Limited” and “Mobile Only” Internet access, “No Car” or “One Car” vehicle access as well as “Home Ownership”. The numbers dynamically change based on the selection made on the interactive map. There are also two separate displays showing 15 year trend in 5 years intervals and 5 year trend in 1 year intervals in each selected category.

11:00 AM - 11:30 AMArcGIS Insights and Data Driven Decisions By Steve Averett & Keith Watkins

ArcGIS Insights provides the city of Greensboro with powerful tool for analysis and reporting of GIS data. As of late, the City has adopted Insights for analyzing and showcasing data that is not always inherently spatial in nature. Using Python and SSMS, data from the City’s Plan Review, Fire, Asset Management, Budget, and Parks systems can be visualized in spatial and non-spatial formats. The resulting dashboards and insights workbooks have sparked a growing interest in the organization and community and are serving the City in becoming a data driven organization.

11:30 AM - 01:30 PMLunch (Awards & Keynote Address)

The Gallery Ballroom

01:30 PM - 02:00 PMThe Viable Utility Reserve and GIS Visualizations By Christyn Fertenbaugh

With the advent of increasingly detailed and interactive virtual options for the presentation and usage of data, the possibilities of using such maps and visualization tools have expanded. The Viable Utility Reserve (VUR) program in the Division of Water Infrastructure (Division) within NCDEQ is broadening their information sharing and staff resources through the usage of GIS-based data visualization tools. The base dataset for these visualizations is a large, detailed spreadsheet containing data for all local governments in North Carolina with water and/or wastewater utilities and includes items such as the total VUR assessment score (updated annually), financial metrics, compliance data, population served, and all individual criterion scores for the aforementioned financial, compliance, and physical metrics. Overlapping, existing maps also include information about county boundaries, NCDEQ regional office service areas, and sectors covered by the various councils of government. An internal dashboard provides a wealth of comprehensive information on local governments with water and/or wastewater utilities for usage by staff, whereas a simpler web map shares the most important information with the general public. The VUR GIS dashboard is utilized by Division staff to identify local governments designated as distressed from those that are not designated, easily review financial/compliance metrics used in the assessment/designation process, and quickly locate these utilities through a search and selection option. A public web map has been created to provide a simpler interface for the website, and features basic color-coded designation status by local government, recent assessment scores, and contact information for VUR staff to assist the public in locating the correct person for questions. Although these two maps use the same base dataset, they provide support to the VUR staff and the Division in diverse ways and can be used to provide varying pictures of the currently designated local governments depending on the needs of staff and/or the public.

02:00 PM - 02:30 PMSpatial Analysis of COVID-19 Variation across Rural and Urban Counties in North Carolina By Chima Okoli

The spatial distribution of human population and inequality in social amenities in Urban and rural regions played a crucial role in the impact of COVID-19. Contemporary research has measured the differences between rural and urban/suburban communities with regards to social, economic, political and health phenomena as well as the varying impact of COVID-19 in these communities; however, there is no study on the space-time changing pattern of COVID-19 cases between rural and urban regions from 2020 till date in North Carolina (NC). This paper is an attempt to quantify the space-time temporal trends for COVID-19 between rural and urban areas in North Carolina on the backdrop of socio-economic and demographic phenomena. This paper will examine how economic inequalities and spatial population distribution greatly impacted the rate of change of recorded COVID cases and fatalities which further underscores the disparities in distribution of social amenities between rural and urban areas. Geospatial analysis using Geographic Information Systems was employed to explore the space-time pattern of COVID cases across the 100 counties in North Carolina on the backdrop of demographic and socio-economic data for North Carolina. A time series analysis was run using a six-month epoch for COVID cases in rural and urban North Carolina while utilizing data from the NC COVID-19 dashboard. The emerging hot spot analysis tool was deployed to carry out space-time pattern mining of the impact of COVID-19 cases in rural and urban counties as well as the changing pattern of the cases at different age units. The resulting space-time patterns reveal that further extensive study may be necessary to fully quantify the impact of COVID-19 in low income and low access communities in contrast to urban regions.

02:30 PM - 03:00 PMOrthoimagery By Ben Shelton & John Derry
03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMNC OneMap/AWS By David Giordano & Brett Spivey
04:30 PM - 05:00 PMGIS & Surveying: Where is the boundary? By Tripp Corbin

The relationship between the GIS and Surveying Professions has historically been antagonistic at best. Both sides have worked to protect what they view as their areas of expertise often without fully understanding what the other does. This presentation will discuss why this conflict exists and then discuss recent efforts by the National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS), National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) and the Urban and Regional Systems Association (URISA) to better define where the line between the professional practice of GIS and Surveying is located.

05:00 PM - 07:00 PMSpecial Interest Groups
07:00 PMExhibits Close
07:30 AM - 08:30 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:30 AM - 09:00 AMMaximizing OMS/GIS Integration By Brett Kinlaw & Josh Locklear

In this presentation, we will focus on how Lumbee River EMC, an electric cooperative in southeastern North Carolina, has leveraged OMS and GIS data to create reliable outage response processes, both internally and externally; and how these processes allow the cooperative to effectively communicate outage information to members, employees, board members & the general public.

Upon completion of the presentation attendees should be able to:

-Recognize opportunities for OMS/GIS integration within their organization.

-Conceptualize communications agreements with local governments and related organizations.

-Develop an effective plan to communicate outage information to members.

09:00 AM - 09:30 AMNC Seamless Parcel Program – Continuing to Evolve and Improve By Elizabeth Daniel

Parcels are a powerful resource, providing critical information used in many areas such as public health, emergency management, utility management, economic development, transportation planning, land development and forestry management. Unfortunately, the usefulness of this parcel information is limited if it is not easily accessible and contiguous across county boundaries. The North Carolina Seamless Parcels Enterprise System is a collaborative project which has succeed in providing locally sourced County level parcel data for all 100 North Carolina Counties. In this Seamless Parcel Program, county data stewards can directly upload their data in its native format to a Transformer which then creates a seamless, up to date parcel fabric for North Carolina. This presentation will outline the collaborative efforts required to implement and maintain the Seamless Parcel Program, review past, current and future program improvements, and finally highlight the important use cases for the Seamless Parcel Dataset.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMBreak
10:00 AM - 10:30 AMThe USGS 3D Hydrography Program: meeting 21st century water resources challenges By Silvia Terziotti

Changes are coming to the way in which USGS and our partners will collect, manage, and maintain hydrography data. The National Hydrography Dataset has been the Nation’s most comprehensive hydrography dataset for over a decade. As USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) data is increasingly available we now have an opportunity to integrate USGS elevation and hydrography data and greatly improve the spatial accuracy of national hydrography mapping. The integrated data will be the foundation of a new 3D Hydrography Program (3DHP) which marks the beginning of a new era of water data designed to meet 21st century water resources challenges. 3DHP data will consist of hydrography and hydrologic units derived from 1-meter 3DEP digital elevation models in CONUS (5-meter resolution in Alaska). Reimagining the nation’s hydrography framework is a big and challenging task, but together we can make 3DHP a reality.

10:30 AM - 11:00 AMFederal Speaker By TBD
11:00 AM - 11:30 AMA National High Resolution Land Cover By Erik Hund

Current, accurate land cover and change information is a common foundational data set that can be used to address a wide range of management issues, from flooding risk and natural infrastructure to policy evaluation and land use planning. Knowing what exists on the ground and how it has changed through time gives planners more information, and the better that data, the better our understanding. For almost two decades, NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management has been producing standardized, 30-meter, land cover and change information for the coastal United States through its Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). More recently, NOAA has been working to establish an operational higher resolution land cover product line, bringing the national C-CAP framework to the local level and allowing for more site-specific, local applications through the production of higher resolution (1-meter) land cover data. The 1-meter land cover provides greater precision and detail, especially with impervious surfaces, allowing coastal managers to support better hydrodynamic modeling, flood risk assessment, and storm water management practices. This presentation will highlight the methods of recent pilot efforts in North Carolina and other coastal states, showcase several recently released products, and detail NOAA’s vision and schedule for upcoming efforts to expand this data out coastwide.

11:30 AM - 01:30 PMLunch (Awards & Keynote Address)

The Gallery Ballroom

01:30 PM - 02:00 PMThe Road to Validation: Putting a Theory on LiDAR Bulk Water Body Elevation to the Test By Doug Newcomb

Standard TIN-based methods of DEM generation include the use of Breaklines to set water body elevations. The creation of Breaklines requires manual creation of polygons that can be subjective and cannot be done economically for smaller water bodies within the area of DEM creation. With the advent of high densities of LiDAR data collection, a raster-based approach using ground point statistics to DEM creation gives reasonable values for land areas with gaps for water bodies.

A method to fill the gaps representing impounded water bodies with accurate water levels was put forth at the 2021 North Carolina GIS Conference. This followup presentation will discuss using the USGS National LiDAR data holdings, USGS Water Level gages, Historic FEMA FIS data, NOAA lidar blogs, and timely assistance from another open source geospatial software user to test the accuracy of an automated raster method of estimating impoundment water levels from edge elevation values.

02:00 PM - 02:30 PMFinding dry detention basins (DDBs) in Greenville, North Carolina—an application of LiDAR and FOSS By Rob Howard

The landscape of Greenville, North Carolina, like most municipalities in the State, is dotted with dry detention basins (DDBs), constructed surface depressions built by developers to satisfy peak-discharge requirements imposed by stormwater management plans. DDBs were a popular option due to their low cost and simplicity; however, to remain effective at slowing the flow of stormwater runoff into streams, DDBs must be properly inspected and maintained. Additionally, DDBs are inferior to more modern stormwater control measures when it comes to removing pollutants such as excess nutrients from runoff, meaning that existing DDBs may be candidates for retrofit projects. Unfortunately, a comprehensive list of DDB locations within the Greenville ETJ is unavailable due to historically poor registration requirements (which now have been corrected), limited resources to comb through thousands of pages of physical construction documents, and the loss of many such documents during the flooding caused by Hurricane Floyd. This knowledge deficit has complicated the City of Greenville’s efforts to implement inspection protocols and retrofit plans for DDBs within their jurisdiction.

In partnership with the City of Greenville and the Center for Watershed Protection, we have developed a simple, low-cost GIS-based approach for identifying and classifying surface depressions, including DDBs, from LiDAR-derived elevation contours. Our technique utilizes free, open-source software such as Python and PostGIS along with freely available public data, and is completely vector-based, making it an efficient and cost-effective solution for expanding DDB inventories.

We leverage the use of random forests, a type of ensemble machine learning algorithm, to classify the surface depressions and improve the accuracy of the results compared to single-tree models. Computable shape metrics, such as shape complexity index, linearity, and fractal dimension, are used to train the algorithm to identify DDBs in the dataset, allowing us to avoid a hard dependency on ancillary data. A set of 118 manually labeled contours, randomly split 50/50, were used for training and validation. The model scored 96% accuracy in validation, indicating its effectiveness in identifying DDBs.

As climate change continues to cause longer and more intense precipitation events, and growing human populations continue to drive an expansion in total impervious area within watersheds, runoff that exceeds the capacity of stormwater infrastructure, including many thousands of DDBs, will become increasing more common. By providing a low-cost, straightforward method of quickly updating DDB inventories, we hope to provide communities with the ability to implement more efficient DDB inspection protocols and retrofit plans to combat these growing challenges.

03:00 PM - 03:30 PMBreak
03:30 PM - 04:00 PMLand Cover Analysis and Supporting Tree Canopy Assessment using Remote Sensing in Wake County, NC By William Shroyer & Joshep Joyner

In 2022, the Wake County government initiated a multi-level collaboration to employ remote sensing methods to analyze land cover throughout the entirety of the 857 square mile county. Among the features collected through the land cover analysis, the study specifically targets tree canopy and will include a ten year canopy change assessment along with a variety of additional analyses looking at future planting opportunities, canopy health, and assessments across numerous environmental and socio-economic factors.

This project is a partnership between Wake County and all twelve of its constituent municipalities; a collaborative effort believed to be an industry first here in North Carolina. The presentation will provide an overview of the project as well as highlight efforts to date

04:00 PM - 04:30 PMTesting the performance of QL1 LiDAR and multispectral imagery for coastal wetland classification By Narcisa G. Pricope

Increasing rates of coastal population growth and climate change impacts including rising sea levels and tropical storm intensification emphasize the need to preserve wetland systems to maintain ecosystem balance and retain essential ecosystem services. Wetland classification and mapping has been performed for decades using aerial or satellite imagery and boots-on-the-ground approaches using a suite of computational approaches. In this study, we devise a fusion approach of LiDAR and multispectral data implemented using machine learning (ML) computational approaches to construct wetland prediction models to map wetland systems and perform wetland classification utilizing the newest, freely available Quality Level 1 (QL1) LiDAR data and most up-to-date multispectral imagery sourced from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). The broad goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of a multispectral and LiDAR derivative fusion approach in mapping wetlands in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina at large spatial scales (~2500 acres) and to further current research in the uses of ML and remote sensing in wetland mapping. Moreover, the majority of data preprocessing, extraction, and modeling was performed within ESRI ArcGIS Pro given the widespread and common use of the GIS platform within stakeholder agencies and organizations and our intent of creating a reproducible workflow based solely on freely available data. We established a comprehensive and reproducible workflow was for preprocessing and predictor variable extraction, as well as a methodology for the creation of training data collected in the field and augmented using orthoimagery. Models performed well in classifying wetlands in estuarine systems in comparison to more inland and forested wetland systems. Wetland classes in which stark terrain differences are prominent are more accurately classified than wetland classes in more homogeneous landscapes. Elevation-based variables and spectral-based vegetation indices appear to be the most influential predictors in modeling and classifying wetlands in coastal regions of North Carolina. To increase model performance, particularly within more homogeneous landscapes, further work should be undertaken in the examination of hydrologic distance based explanatory variables, as well as further refinement of hydrological explanatory variable extraction from LiDAR data.

04:30 PM - 05:00 PMUsing High-Density Lidar to Find the Fault (Sparta, NC 2020 Earthquake) By Michael Baranowski

The US Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively engaged in collecting and publishing high-quality lidar-derived elevation data through the 3D-Elevation Project. With ever improving lidar technology, (1) achievable pulse densities and vertical accuracies are increasing well beyond QL2 specification and (2) generally the cost for increasing lidar quality are decreasing. With the newer technologies offering greater terrain resolution, applications previously unavailable or cost-prohibitive to lidar survey have been emerging. High-resolution lidar data provide the gateway to evaluate subtle changes in the terrain morphology, such as karst features, subsidence, uplifts, and fault lines. A recent seismic event near Sparta, North Carolina illustrates an emerging high-resolution lidar application.

  • Salem 1A
  • Salem 1B/C
  • Salem 2
  • Salem 3A
  • Salem 3B
  • Salem 3C
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMVendor Presentation By TBD
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMTown Hall Closing Session

Salem 2 Ballroom

12:00 PMExhibits Close
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMIs ArcGIS Pro ready to be your daily Desktop GIS App? By Tripp Corbin

ArcGIS Pro is replacing our tried and true ArcMap and ArcCatalog. Since its release in 2015 Esri has been dedicating a tremendous resources to getting ArcGIS Pro so it has the functionality most users expect and is stable. Has Esri succeeded in creating an application that is ready to be your daily driver GIS desktop application? This presentation will try to help you answer that question. We will discuss what the current version of ArcGIS Pro can do, cannot do and other considerations you need to know so you can decide if now is the time to make the switch.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMThe Effect of Gestalt Principles on Visual Search on Maps By Dave Michelson

Lets explore visual search and gestalt princples to understand how perceptual psychology can:

  1. Improve map readers’ability to accomplish map-reading tasks.
  2. Decrease the likelihood that the map reader will make errors.
  3. Lessen the map designer’s reliance on experience and intuition.
  4. Help identify bigfoot habitats.
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMTown Hall Closing Session

Salem 2 Ballroom

12:00 PMExhibits Close
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 10:30 AMNC Neighbors Panel
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMTown Hall Closing Session

Salem 2 Ballroom

12:00 PMExhibits Close
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
09:30 AM - 10:00 AMHerb Stout Student By TBD
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMTown Hall Closing Session

Salem 2 Ballroom

12:00 PMExhibits Close
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
08:00 AMExhibits Open
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMLeveraging AGOL Python Notebooks to Streamline Daily Tasks and Improve Email Notifications By John Lovette

As GIS analysts, repeated daily tasks can consume hours of our workday. Additionally, while the cloud storage capabilities of ArcGIS Online (AGOL) greatly simplify data sharing and public data collection, the credential requirements of AGOL can make scripting tasks cumbersome or potentially insecure when handled outside of the GIS environment. ESRI’s hosted Python Notebooks provide a convenient platform for automating the access and manipulation of data stored in AGOL, including the option to schedule tasks and, with some additional pieces, send notifications. This presentation will highlight workflow efficiencies implemented at NC Wildlife Resources Commission using hosted notebooks and will delve into extensions of the process that allow for convenient email notifications using two different platforms. Lessons learned and hopes for future changes will also be discussed, particularly as they relate to working within the State’s IT infrastructure.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMVisualizing Departmental, Business, and Citizen Use of GIS By Kent Rothrock & Wendy Peloquin

The use of GIS continues to expand at many government organizations. However, many lack a consolidated chart or dashboard illustrating the detailed usage of GIS (layers and fields) and interdependencies between various information products such as maps, apps, and reports.

This presentation introduces you to a simple approach for your GIS and IT departments to author and share these online information model charts and information model dashboards using Avineon’s Model Manager Add-In for ArcGIS Pro and Insights for ArcGIS from Esri. This approach improves collaboration, information sharing, and governance for GIS.

You will see a sample chart and dashboard summarizing the use of GIS by departments, agencies, and offices such as Accounts, Agriculture, Arts, Aviation, Audit, Behavioral Health, Community Development, Culture, Corrections, Courts, Electric, Elected Officials, Water, Sewer, Economy, Education, Environment, Emergency Management, Employment, Family, Finance, Fire & Rescue, Forestry, Fisheries, Health, Human Resources, Housing, Information Technology, Innovation, Justice, Labor, Legislation, Libraries, Military, Museums, Natural Resources, Park, Recreation, Rehabilitation, Police, Public Safety, Public Works, Planning, Ports, Purchasing, Social, Tax, Tourism, Transportation, Treasury, Motor Vehicles, Universities, Voter Registration, Veterans, etc., along with the businesses and citizens served within the communities.

10:30 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMTown Hall Closing Session

Salem 2 Ballroom

12:00 PMExhibits Close
08:00 AM - 09:00 AMRegistration Opens & Continental Breakfast
09:00 AM - 09:30 AMTransforming Recreation & Parks Operations By Josh Billings

The City of Winston-Salem Recreation & Parks department has utilized GIS to improve park planning, operational efficiency, data-driven decision making and citizen inclusion. This session demonstrates how the Recreation & Parks department has fundamentally transformed data dissemination and decision making while integrating different technologies into our workflows.

09:30 AM - 10:00 AMMeditations on Minimalism in Geospatial Applications By Ryan Cooper

Low- and no-code mapping platforms like ArcGIS Online and CARTO provide the means to rapidly develop web applications that enable sophisticated querying and visualization of spatial datasets. Accompanying this relative ease of development can be the temptation to “throw the kitchen sink” at users. Indeed, the maturation of the Web platform and the tools that leverage it mean geospatial application builders can package every layer, filter, and summary chart the end-user might be interested in into an increasingly crowded user-interface. But once the application is deployed, are users utilizing this enhanced functionality? Can they actually find the critical information they need? Building on discussions in the broader UI/UX space and lessons from data journalism, this talk suggests strategies and tools for building user-centered, geospatial applications that provide rich insights without overwhelming end-users.

10:30 AM - 11:00 AMBreak
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMTown Hall Closing Session

Salem 2 Ballroom

Student

$150/ person
  • Access to all sessions
  • Access to all food & beverage
  • Admissions to evening social
  • Network with GIS professionals
  • Daily rate: $75
Best Value

Full Conference

$350/ person (+$75 after 1/23/23)
  • Access to all sessions
  • Access to all food & beverage
  • Admission to evening social
  • Meet with leading vendors
  • Daily rate: $200 (+$100 after 1/23/23)

Speaker

$250/ person
  • Access to all sessions
  • Access to all food & beverage
  • Admission to the evening social
  • Meet with colleagues
  • Daily rate: $200

Testimonials

See what other people are saying about us.

Pam C.
Pam C.Henderson County

“It is always one of my favorites. NC has the best GIS and you know your up with what is going on in GIS when you attend.”

Karyl F.
Karyl F.TJCOG

“There was a good mix of beginner to expert level content and there were a lot of good updates from state/federal agencies."

Natalie C.
Natalie C.City of Greenville

“I always leave with a notebook full of ideas to test, data to research, and new friends to keep in touch with. The NCGIS Conference is the premiere event to meet and mingle with GIS colleagues from across the state of North Carolina and beyond.”

Matthew W.
Matthew W.City of Winston-Salem

“Thank you for the hard work in putting together. I've been attending since 2009 and this is my favorite conference.”

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